buf.patch   The American Legion of Montana   flag map of montana-555px

Post #135 Smoke Signals - December 2016

Post #135 Smoke Signals - February 2017

Post #135 Smoke Signals- April 2017

 

2013 Boy Scout Jamboree

IMG 00000190

p91flag art

CORVALLIS – Sometime back in the mid-1940s, someone from Corvallis’ American Legion Post 91 brought a brass bugle to one of that group’s affairs.

No one today knows exactly how that all happened.

They do know for years that bugle played the quintessential “Taps” when community members gathered on Memorial Day at the Corvallis Cemetery to honor the veterans buried there with a reading of their names.

That’s not been the case for a good number of years.

The bugle was replaced by a sound system and a couple of speakers that traveled with Corvallis American Legion honor guard members wherever they served to honor a deceased veteran.

About a month ago, that all changed.

That long lost bugle was found hanging in a Corvallis garage.

American Legion members took it to a bugle repairman, who took out the dents, made a couple of repairs and made it shine again.

And then the Legion’s historian, Doug Mason, reached clear back to his high school roots and re-taught himself how to play in a basement room at his home.

The Friday before last, Mason stepped up and played “Taps” at a veteran’s funeral as part of the American Legion Post 91 honor guard.

“A lot of people came up and said they really enjoyed hearing the old bugle,” Mason said. “It just sounds different from the canned music. When someone grows up hearing that, it can be kind of comforting.”

On Monday, May 27, Mason will play again at the 93rd annual tradition of honoring the veterans buried at the Corvallis Cemetery following the Corvallis Memorial Day Parade.

“It will be nice to bring that tradition back,” he said.

World War I veterans started the Corvallis Memorial Day parade after they returned home from Europe. The first parade was a simple thing consisting of a color guard and veterans who staged in the alley to the west of Main Street.

Today, hundreds line the streets to watch the patriotic floats and other varied parade entries amble past starting at 10 a.m.

This year’s parade theme is “For God and Country.” The parade marshal is Bob Reutlinger.

The event begins with a breakfast at the Corvallis High School lunchroom from 7 to 9 a.m. that’s sponsored by the Corvallis Community Event Center.

The parade begins at the north end of Main Street.

At noon, the American Legion will conduct its memorial service at the Corvallis Cemetery. Immediately afterward, the wreath ceremony will take place at the Woodside Cutoff Bridge.

The Wild Mare is hosting a “Give Back” barbecue from noon to 3 p.m. All the proceeds will go to the Wounded Warriors Project. The restaurant is located at the corner of Market and Second streets.

Anyone wanting to participate in the parade should contact Ike Slaughter at 777-1339. Parade participants are asked to pre-register at www.corvallispost91.com.

Reach reporter Perry Backus at 363-3300 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it." target="_blank" style="color: #1155cc;">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

p91parade

 

CORVALLIS – It wouldn’t be Memorial Day in Corvallis without the sights and sounds of bagpipes, skydivers, antique tractors, miniature donkeys, buckets of candy, fire engine sirens, and a sea of red, white and blue.

Hosted by Corvallis American Legion Post 91 and the Ladies Auxiliary, the 93rd annual Corvallis Memorial Day parade drew a crowd of thousands to Main Street on Monday morning to pay tribute to all the men and women who have died serving in the U.S. armed forces.

“This is patriotic Corvallis,” said Tony Malley, chaplain and past commandant of the Bitterroot Valley Marine Corps League Detachment 937. “Everyone comes out to support those who have fought and given their lives for this country. It’s a great event for the whole community.”

The commemoration was started in 1920 by World War I veterans after they returned home from Europe. That first parade consisted of a color guard and a small group of veterans, and the celebration has become a fixture in the community ever since.

This year, the parade had several important last-minute entries, as local high school students brought home a host of state championship trophies over the weekend and parade organizers rushed to make sure they were represented.

The Corvallis High School girls’ tennis team and girls’ track team brought home Class A team championships, to go along with several individual titles. The Bitter Root Valley Warriors Rugby Football team, comprised of many players from Corvallis, won the state championship over the Missoula Mud Dogs on Saturday in Billings, and in Class A boys’ tennis, Corvallis senior Bridger Walczynski earned his fourth straight doubles title, a historic achievement, and his second title paired with sophomore DJ Pekoc.

Several large flatbed trailers had to be rounded up for all the kids and their hardware, and the parade announcers had their hands full keeping track of just how many titles the hometown athletes racked up this year.

Edna Nasca, the commander of Corvallis American Legion Post 91, was so busy keeping things flowing smoothly that she barely had time to watch the parade herself.

“We had a pretty good turnout this year,” she said. “I think everyone’s having a great time, as always. The weather cooperated, at least. This is the first chance I’ve gotten to actually watch.”

The grand marshal of the parade this year was Bob Reutlinger, who served as a flight instructor in World War II and as a battalion motor officer during the Korean War.

The Corvallis Community Festival started the minute the parade ended, as people lined up to buy hot dogs and homemade pie, and play carnival games. The American Legion conducted a memorial service at the Corvallis Cemetery, followed by a wreath ceremony at the Woodside Cutoff Bridge.

Malley said that although Memorial Day is dedicated to those who have perished, it’s also a good time to remind people how important it is to care for and honor living veterans.

“We have a lot of guys coming home,” he said. “There’s a lot of veterans coming back and we want to work with them and their families. That’s why we’re here.”

Reach reporter David Erickson at 363-3300 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it." target="_blank" style="color: #1155cc;">david.erickson@ravallirepublic.com.

P94FPB

Fred and Patsy Burnell at a ceremony for Fred being named Legionnaire of the year by Fort Owens Post 94 in Stevensville. Fred has served tirelessly for the Legion at many levels and positions for over 68 years. His father served with the Legion also and combined they have over 100 years of service to the American Legion. 

P94SO

Fort Owens Post 94 of Stevensville Honor Guard led by Bill Jette at the opening day ceremonies of the annual Special Olympics held at Lost Trail Pass ski area. Post 94 has been an active participant from the outset and has lead the parade of Olympians yearly.

P94Travel

This was taken on our annual trip to visit the veterans on Valentines day where cards, smiles, and gratitude were passed on to the veterans. The trip is a cooperative effort by Stevensville school district and Fort Owens Post 94 of Stevensville. The trip is to show support and tribute to those who have served and to bring some cheer into their day. 

renew online button

      lit-sm

Daily Membership Report

   mem-logo

facebookfindus

Montana Legionnaire

      nwsltr logo

POW / MIA Of Montana

   POW-MIA

usaalogo2015

Target Dates

target dates

post911gibill

Department Directory